Linux is bloatware too

My software guru buddy points out that script-kiddie hackers are working to make Linux just like Windows. The problem is Windows sucks.
Windows is bloatware that takes up a huge amount of disk space and gobble up gigabytes of memory. I wrote this letter to Suse in 2002. Nobody must have read it, or you wouldn't have to install gui desktop libraries in today's Suse in order to play a MP3 file. Now Linux is turning into a Gordian knot with stupid partitioning, just like Windows.

Hello.
I bought a Suse 8 Professional directly from Suse to give you the maximum profit in order to support your work. Now I fear I am not underwriting an alternative to Microsoft but just funding the creation of yet another amoral peddler of bloatware.

I see I am not even entitled to support.  I only have 32 Meg of RAM. This makes me unworthy of support.  I wanted to first try Suse on an old unused machine at work.  The machine currently runs Windows 95.  I'm sure I could install Windows 98 on it as well. Windows 95 will run fine on 8 megs because I am doing so on some really old machines I have here at home.  I am writing this letter on a machine with a Gigabyte of RAM and a 2 GigaHz processor as well as 100 GigaBytes of disk space.  Do not expect to get installed on this machine until I can install Suse on the old one. We have to crawl before we walk, much less fly.

Bill "Bloatware" Gates can provide an OS that will install and run 32 bit applications in protected mode using 8 megs of RAM but Suse needs 64 megs TO EVEN INSTALL.  This is more than a little pathetic.  I am extremely disappointed and dejected.  I had heard Linux was perfect for those old unused machines because it was not bloatware.  I guess you wanted to be so much like Windows you had to make 8.0 a bigger pig than Windows itself.  You succeeded.  I feel betrayed.

As you know, I cannot install Suse 8 because Yast is now too large and bloated to fit in "only" 32Meg of RAM.  I am a hardware engineer.  Do you have any idea how immense 32 megs of RAM are? You can do a nice full-screen editor in a single code segment of 64 kilo bytes.  And yet Yast needs 32 meg.  It tries to install.  It asks for a swap partition.  But since this is the first instal there is no file system partitions available on which to make a swap file partition.  My guru buddy who installed my Suse 6.4 on an old Pentium II says this is especially infuriating because the Linux kernel is actually loaded-- you just do not let us do an <alt> F2 to get a console up were we could crowbar in a swap file partition.  I am more then willing to destroy the Windows partition on the drive.

I think many people want to experiment with Linux on old discarded machines like the one I have at work.  When our summer intern showed up we got her up and on the intra/internet with this old box while we waited for a modern box to arrive.  It served her well.  Yet I cannot even install Suse on it.  How sad.  How very sad.

I have the feeling that Suse took this beautiful slender Finnish ballerina and fed her beer and strudel and lard sandwiches until now she is a fat drunken slovenly East German hausfrau belching and vomiting on her peasant dress as she sways back and forth on a beer-soaked wooden bench all the while yelling:  "RAM!  I vant more RAM! Give me more RAM!" I guess "RAM mach frie" huh?

My current plan is to try and install my Suse 6.4 and then upgrade to 8. I also will evaluate Red Hat to see if they are such RAM pigs.  My guru friend has always supported Suse because he felt you really understood Linux.  He is even more disappointed than me.  Using Red Hat is so....so...well.... so mainstream---- so provincial.  I mind as well use a 28k modem and AOL.  Oh well, we're all bloatware now.  C'est dommage.

Paul Rako
25 Jul 2002
Silicon Valley, California

cc: Linus Torvalds, Transmeta Inc.
      redhat

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This page contains a single entry by Paul Rako published on July 2, 2011 10:23 AM.

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